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Utopian Movements and Ideas of the Great Depression: Dreamers, Believers, and Madmen

History


by
Donald W. Whisenhunt

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 200 pages

File size: 1.5 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Utopian Movements and Ideas of the Great Depression explores several lesser known movements for change and reform in the Great Depression Era of the 1930s.  It includes studies of a few communal societies,  proposals for reform, and analyses of several books written in the 1930s that propose solutions to the nation’s economic ills.  Arguably, America has been a Utopian experiment from its beginning; these movements and ideas of the 1930s were the latest manifestation of that experiment to that time. Despite their lack of obvious success, they represent an important American idea- that an average person could devise solutions to society’s problems.  They embody the American belief in progress and the power of the individual.

Utopian Movements and Ideas of the Great Depression explores several lesser known movements for change and reform in the Great Depression Era of the 1930s.  It includes studies of a few communal societies,  proposals for reform, and analyses of several books written in the 1930s that propose solutions to the nation’s economic ills.  Arguably, America has been a Utopian experiment from its beginning; these movements and ideas of the 1930s were the latest manifestation… (more)

Utopian Movements and Ideas of the Great Depression explores several lesser known movements for change and reform in the Great Depression Era of the 1930s.  It includes studies of a few communal societies,  proposals for reform, and analyses of several books written in the 1930s that propose solutions to the nation’s economic ills.  Arguably, America has been a Utopian experiment from its beginning; these movements and ideas of the 1930s were the latest manifestation of that experiment to that time. Despite their lack of obvious success, they represent an important American idea- that an average person could devise solutions to society’s problems.  They embody the American belief in progress and the power of the individual.

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