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Unfit Commander: Texans for Truth Take on George W. Bush

Social science


by
Glenn W. Smith

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 384 pages

File size: 37.1 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Ever since George W. Bush began running for public office in the 1990s, questions have been raised in the public eye about his service in the Air National Guard during the late 1960s and early 1970s — when countless American soldiers (John Kerry among them) were serving heroically in Vietnam. By the time of the presidential race in 2000, it was clear that Bush’s record of service contained several troubling gaps — especially in the period between May 1972 and May 1973, when Bush was supposed to have transferred to the Alabama Air National Guard. In early 2004, as the election season heated up, the White House bowed to pressure and released a host of documents related to Bush’s service, promising that this disclosure would put the matter to rest. Yet the documents raised as many new questions as they answered. Now, for the first time, the comprehensive written record of George W. Bush’s military career — more than 250 pages in all — is presented in book form. In his introduction and commentary, longtime activist and author Glenn W. Smith, the founder of Texans for Truth, highlights such questions as:

Unfit Commander also tracks the Bush administration’s efforts to defuse the controversy, from Bush’s own claim that he “put in his time,” to the White House’s record of unyielding non-denial denials despite the persistent questioning of the press. And at the heart of the book are the documents themselves: from Bush’s agreement that “failure to satisfactorily complete [full] pilot training will result in my being discharged,” to his supervisor’s statement that “Lt Bush has not been observed at this unit” during the critical period. A provocative exploration of this commander in chief’s spotty record of personal military service, Unfit Commander is the place to start for anyone interested in getting at the truths of President Bush’s character.

Ever since George W. Bush began running for public office in the 1990s, questions have been raised in the public eye about his service in the Air National Guard during the late 1960s and early 1970s — when countless American soldiers (John Kerry among them) were serving heroically in Vietnam. By the time of the presidential race in 2000, it was clear that Bush’s record of service contained several troubling gaps — especially in the period between May 1972 and May‚Ķ (more)

Ever since George W. Bush began running for public office in the 1990s, questions have been raised in the public eye about his service in the Air National Guard during the late 1960s and early 1970s — when countless American soldiers (John Kerry among them) were serving heroically in Vietnam. By the time of the presidential race in 2000, it was clear that Bush’s record of service contained several troubling gaps — especially in the period between May 1972 and May 1973, when Bush was supposed to have transferred to the Alabama Air National Guard. In early 2004, as the election season heated up, the White House bowed to pressure and released a host of documents related to Bush’s service, promising that this disclosure would put the matter to rest. Yet the documents raised as many new questions as they answered. Now, for the first time, the comprehensive written record of George W. Bush’s military career — more than 250 pages in all — is presented in book form. In his introduction and commentary, longtime activist and author Glenn W. Smith, the founder of Texans for Truth, highlights such questions as:

Unfit Commander also tracks the Bush administration’s efforts to defuse the controversy, from Bush’s own claim that he “put in his time,” to the White House’s record of unyielding non-denial denials despite the persistent questioning of the press. And at the heart of the book are the documents themselves: from Bush’s agreement that “failure to satisfactorily complete [full] pilot training will result in my being discharged,” to his supervisor’s statement that “Lt Bush has not been observed at this unit” during the critical period. A provocative exploration of this commander in chief’s spotty record of personal military service, Unfit Commander is the place to start for anyone interested in getting at the truths of President Bush’s character.

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