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Torture, Intelligence and Sousveillance in the War on Terror: Agenda-Building Struggles

Social science


by
Vian Bakir

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 328 pages

File size: 4.8 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

This book examines the communication battles of the Bush and Blair political administrations (and those of their successors) over their use of torture to gain intelligence for the War on Terror. Exploring the agenda-building drivers that exposed the torture-intelligence nexus and presenting case studies of key media events from the UK and USA, it examines dominant political discourses on the torture-for-intelligence policy and evaluates various modes of resistance to governments’ attempts at strategic political communication, with particular attention to ‘sousveillance’: community-based recording from first-person perspectives. As such, it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in media, sociology, political communication, international relations, and journalism.

This book examines the communication battles of the Bush and Blair political administrations (and those of their successors) over their use of torture to gain intelligence for the War on Terror. Exploring the agenda-building drivers that exposed the torture-intelligence nexus and presenting case studies of key media events from the UK and USA, it examines dominant political discourses on the torture-for-intelligence policy and evaluates various modes of resistance‚Ķ (more)

This book examines the communication battles of the Bush and Blair political administrations (and those of their successors) over their use of torture to gain intelligence for the War on Terror. Exploring the agenda-building drivers that exposed the torture-intelligence nexus and presenting case studies of key media events from the UK and USA, it examines dominant political discourses on the torture-for-intelligence policy and evaluates various modes of resistance to governments’ attempts at strategic political communication, with particular attention to ‘sousveillance’: community-based recording from first-person perspectives. As such, it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in media, sociology, political communication, international relations, and journalism.

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