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The People of Devon in the First World War

History


by
David Parker

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 288 pages

File size: 5.1 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

This beautifully illustrated social history of Devon during the First World War examines the cultural changes brought about during this period. Every sector of society felt the impact of the war acutely. People pulled together in some things, and pulled apart in others. Men had to decide whether to enlist or not, and risk the social, moral and physical consequences of their decisions to be servicemen or remain civilians. Conscription, meanwhile, brought other keenly-felt social, political and personal issues to the surface. Thematically divided, this fascinating and timely study explores the experiences of many of Devon’s people: soldiers, aliens and spies (real and imagined); refugees, conscientious objectors; nurses and doctors; churchmen, the changing roles of women and children; and finally, of course, of farmers. It provides a moving tribute to the price paid by Devon and its people during the War to End All Wars.

This beautifully illustrated social history of Devon during the First World War examines the cultural changes brought about during this period. Every sector of society felt the impact of the war acutely. People pulled together in some things, and pulled apart in others. Men had to decide whether to enlist or not, and risk the social, moral and physical consequences of their decisions to be servicemen or remain civilians. Conscription, meanwhile, brought other keenly-felt… (more)

This beautifully illustrated social history of Devon during the First World War examines the cultural changes brought about during this period. Every sector of society felt the impact of the war acutely. People pulled together in some things, and pulled apart in others. Men had to decide whether to enlist or not, and risk the social, moral and physical consequences of their decisions to be servicemen or remain civilians. Conscription, meanwhile, brought other keenly-felt social, political and personal issues to the surface. Thematically divided, this fascinating and timely study explores the experiences of many of Devon’s people: soldiers, aliens and spies (real and imagined); refugees, conscientious objectors; nurses and doctors; churchmen, the changing roles of women and children; and finally, of course, of farmers. It provides a moving tribute to the price paid by Devon and its people during the War to End All Wars.

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