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The Hallelujah Effect: Philosophical Reflections on Music, Performance Practice, and Technology

Arts


by
Babette Babich

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 324 pages

File size: 19.1 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

This book studies the working efficacy of Leonard Cohen’s song Hallelujah in the context of today’s network culture. Especially as recorded on YouTube, k.d. lang’s interpretation(s) of Cohen’s Hallelujah embody, acoustically and visually/viscerally, what Nietzsche named the ‘spirit of music’. Today, the working of music is magnified and transformed by recording dynamics and mediated via Facebook exchanges, blog postings and video sites. Given the sexual/religious core of Cohen’s Hallelujah, this study poses a phenomenological reading of the objectification of both men and women, raising the question of desire, including gender issues and both homosexual and heterosexual desire.

This book studies the working efficacy of Leonard Cohen’s song Hallelujah in the context of today’s network culture. Especially as recorded on YouTube, k.d. lang’s interpretation(s) of Cohen’s Hallelujah embody, acoustically and visually/viscerally, what Nietzsche named the ‘spirit of music’. Today, the working of music is magnified and transformed by recording dynamics and mediated via Facebook exchanges, blog postings and video sites. Given the sexual/religious… (more)

This book studies the working efficacy of Leonard Cohen’s song Hallelujah in the context of today’s network culture. Especially as recorded on YouTube, k.d. lang’s interpretation(s) of Cohen’s Hallelujah embody, acoustically and visually/viscerally, what Nietzsche named the ‘spirit of music’. Today, the working of music is magnified and transformed by recording dynamics and mediated via Facebook exchanges, blog postings and video sites. Given the sexual/religious core of Cohen’s Hallelujah, this study poses a phenomenological reading of the objectification of both men and women, raising the question of desire, including gender issues and both homosexual and heterosexual desire.

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