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Struggle for Ethnic Identity: Narratives by Asian American Professionals

Social science


by
Pyong Gap Min (Author) and Rose Kim (Editor)

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 240 pages

File size: 539 KB

Protection: DRM

Language: English


Dr. Pyong Gap Min and Rose Kim present a compilation of narratives on ethnic identity written by first-, 1.5-, and second-generation Asian American professionals. In an attempt to reconcile the dichotomies long associated with being both Asian and American, these narratives trace the formation of each author’s ethnic identity and discuss its importance in shaping his or her professional career. The narratives touch upon common themes of prejudice and discrimination, loss and retention of ethnic subculture, ethnic versus non-ethnic friendship networks, and racial and inter-racial dating patterns. When coupled with Dr. Min’s comprehensive introductory chapter on contemporary trends in the study of ethnicity, these narratives prove that constructing one’s ethnicity is truly a dynamic process and serve as an invaluable resource for anyone interested in teaching or studying the concepts of ethnic identity.

Dr. Pyong Gap Min and Rose Kim present a compilation of narratives on ethnic identity written by first-, 1.5-, and second-generation Asian American professionals. In an attempt to reconcile the dichotomies long associated with being both Asian and American, these narratives trace the formation of each author’s ethnic identity and discuss its importance in shaping his or her professional career. The narratives touch upon common themes of prejudice and discrimination,… (more)

Dr. Pyong Gap Min and Rose Kim present a compilation of narratives on ethnic identity written by first-, 1.5-, and second-generation Asian American professionals. In an attempt to reconcile the dichotomies long associated with being both Asian and American, these narratives trace the formation of each author’s ethnic identity and discuss its importance in shaping his or her professional career. The narratives touch upon common themes of prejudice and discrimination, loss and retention of ethnic subculture, ethnic versus non-ethnic friendship networks, and racial and inter-racial dating patterns. When coupled with Dr. Min’s comprehensive introductory chapter on contemporary trends in the study of ethnicity, these narratives prove that constructing one’s ethnicity is truly a dynamic process and serve as an invaluable resource for anyone interested in teaching or studying the concepts of ethnic identity.

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