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Spectres of 1919: Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro

History


by
Barbara Foley

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 328 pages

File size: 2.2 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

With the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the 1920s was a landmark decade in African American political and cultural history, characterized by an upsurge in racial awareness, artistic creativity, and anticapitalist radicalism. In Spectres of 1919 Barbara Foley draws from a wealth of primary sources to examine the turbulent year 1919, viewing it as the political crucible in which the radicalism of the 1920s was forged. “Absorbing and provocative. While other scholars have nibbled around the edges of the radical roots of the New Negro movement, Foley has deeply engaged the subject. Her scholarship is meticulous and impressive, her writing style clear, direct, and forceful. This is ground-breaking scholarship of the highest order.” — James A. Miller, author of Harlem: The Vision of Morgan and Marvin Smith

With the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the 1920s was a landmark decade in African American political and cultural history, characterized by an upsurge in racial awareness, artistic creativity, and anticapitalist radicalism. In Spectres of 1919 Barbara Foley draws from a wealth of primary sources to examine the turbulent year 1919, viewing it as the political crucible in which the radicalism of the 1920s was forged. “Absorbing and provocative. While… (more)

With the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the 1920s was a landmark decade in African American political and cultural history, characterized by an upsurge in racial awareness, artistic creativity, and anticapitalist radicalism. In Spectres of 1919 Barbara Foley draws from a wealth of primary sources to examine the turbulent year 1919, viewing it as the political crucible in which the radicalism of the 1920s was forged. “Absorbing and provocative. While other scholars have nibbled around the edges of the radical roots of the New Negro movement, Foley has deeply engaged the subject. Her scholarship is meticulous and impressive, her writing style clear, direct, and forceful. This is ground-breaking scholarship of the highest order.” — James A. Miller, author of Harlem: The Vision of Morgan and Marvin Smith

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