Menu

Prospero’s Cell (Faber Library 4)

Travel


by
Lawrence Durrell

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 176 pages

File size: 1.5 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

A guide to the landscape and manners of the island of Corfu. ‘One of Lawrence Durrell’s best books – indeed, in its gem-like miniature quality, among the best books ever written.’ Freya Stark ‘This charming idyll depicts the country life and cosmopolitan society of Corfu in the years immediately before the war . . . The matter of it is as sound as the story is delightful.’ Sunday Times ‘Corfu, that Ionian island whose idyllic yet blood-stained history goes back the best part of a thousand years, could not have found a fitter chronicler than Mr Durrell. For he is a poet, with all a poet’s sensibility, and a humanist to boot, with a keen eye for character and a scholar’s reverence for antiquity.’ Daily Telegraph

A guide to the landscape and manners of the island of Corfu. ‘One of Lawrence Durrell’s best books – indeed, in its gem-like miniature quality, among the best books ever written.’ Freya Stark ‘This charming idyll depicts the country life and cosmopolitan society of Corfu in the years immediately before the war . . . The matter of it is as sound as the story is delightful.’ Sunday Times ‘Corfu, that Ionian island whose idyllic yet blood-stained history goes back theā€¦ (more)

A guide to the landscape and manners of the island of Corfu. ‘One of Lawrence Durrell’s best books – indeed, in its gem-like miniature quality, among the best books ever written.’ Freya Stark ‘This charming idyll depicts the country life and cosmopolitan society of Corfu in the years immediately before the war . . . The matter of it is as sound as the story is delightful.’ Sunday Times ‘Corfu, that Ionian island whose idyllic yet blood-stained history goes back the best part of a thousand years, could not have found a fitter chronicler than Mr Durrell. For he is a poet, with all a poet’s sensibility, and a humanist to boot, with a keen eye for character and a scholar’s reverence for antiquity.’ Daily Telegraph

(less)