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Persian Gardens & Garden Pavilions

Nature, recreation and sports


by
Donald N. Wilber

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 240 pages

File size: 42.2 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

The garden has always had a special meaning for the Persian. The Persian garden, with its flowing pools, fountains, waterways, rows of tall trees, rich arrays of fruit trees and flowers, and cool pavilions, has represented an image of paradise. It was no doubt the relatively arid climate and lack of greenery of the Iranian topography that gave the garden such a supreme value. Persian literature, poetry, and art all reflect this deep-felt attachment to the garden.

The present work is both a comprehensive survey and an appreciation of this Persian tradition of gardens and garden pavilions. The text traces the historical development of Persian gardens, describes their basic features, surveys existing examples, and discusses the literature and tradition behind them. The 119 illustrations include detailed plans and photographs of surviving gardens and their pavilions made on the spot, as well as a comprehensive collection of paintings, lithographs, and drawings of the nineteenth century executed both by Persian artists and by European travelers and emissaries of the period.

The author points out, the gardeners who read this book should come across many details and ideas that can be incorporated into their own kinds of gardens.

The garden has always had a special meaning for the Persian. The Persian garden, with its flowing pools, fountains, waterways, rows of tall trees, rich arrays of fruit trees and flowers, and cool pavilions, has represented an image of paradise. It was no doubt the relatively arid climate and lack of greenery of the Iranian topography that gave the garden such a supreme value. Persian literature, poetry, and art all reflect this deep-felt attachment to the garden.… (more)

The garden has always had a special meaning for the Persian. The Persian garden, with its flowing pools, fountains, waterways, rows of tall trees, rich arrays of fruit trees and flowers, and cool pavilions, has represented an image of paradise. It was no doubt the relatively arid climate and lack of greenery of the Iranian topography that gave the garden such a supreme value. Persian literature, poetry, and art all reflect this deep-felt attachment to the garden.

The present work is both a comprehensive survey and an appreciation of this Persian tradition of gardens and garden pavilions. The text traces the historical development of Persian gardens, describes their basic features, surveys existing examples, and discusses the literature and tradition behind them. The 119 illustrations include detailed plans and photographs of surviving gardens and their pavilions made on the spot, as well as a comprehensive collection of paintings, lithographs, and drawings of the nineteenth century executed both by Persian artists and by European travelers and emissaries of the period.

The author points out, the gardeners who read this book should come across many details and ideas that can be incorporated into their own kinds of gardens.

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