Out of the Revolution: The Development of Africana Studies


by
Delores P. Aldridge (Editor) and Carlene Young (Editor)

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 608 pages

File size: 3.6 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English


In Out of the Revolution, Delores P. Aldridge and Carlene Young collect thirty-one of the nation’s top scholars to provide a complete reference for understanding the impetus for, the development of, and future considerations for the discipline of ‘Africana’ studies. Topics addressed include epistemological considerations; humanistic perspectives; the role of bureaucracy and the academic institution; the social, psychological, political, and economic dimensions; the position of black women in the field; and how the discipline has empowered the black student. This invaluable resource for educators and students alike concludes with a look at graduates in Africana studies and their careers and a discussion of the future of the field.

In Out of the Revolution, Delores P. Aldridge and Carlene Young collect thirty-one of the nation’s top scholars to provide a complete reference for understanding the impetus for, the development of, and future considerations for the discipline of ‘Africana’ studies. Topics addressed include epistemological considerations; humanistic perspectives; the role of bureaucracy and the academic institution; the social, psychological, political, and economic dimensions; the… (more)

In Out of the Revolution, Delores P. Aldridge and Carlene Young collect thirty-one of the nation’s top scholars to provide a complete reference for understanding the impetus for, the development of, and future considerations for the discipline of ‘Africana’ studies. Topics addressed include epistemological considerations; humanistic perspectives; the role of bureaucracy and the academic institution; the social, psychological, political, and economic dimensions; the position of black women in the field; and how the discipline has empowered the black student. This invaluable resource for educators and students alike concludes with a look at graduates in Africana studies and their careers and a discussion of the future of the field.

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