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Medicine, Charity and Mutual Aid: The Consumption of Health and Welfare in Britain, c.1550-1950

History


by
Anne Borsay (Editor) and Peter Shapely (Editor)

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 284 pages

File size: 2.4 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English


This book focuses on the recipients of charity, rather than the donors or institutions. By doing so, it tackles searching questions of social control and cohesion, and the relationship between providers and recipients in a new and revealing manner. It is shown how these issues changed over the course of the nineteenth century, as the frontier between state and the voluntary sector shifted away from charity towards greater reliance on public finance, workers’ contributions and mutual aid. In turn, these new sources of assistance enriched civil society, encouraging democratization, empowerment and social inclusion for previously marginalized members of the community.

This book focuses on the recipients of charity, rather than the donors or institutions. By doing so, it tackles searching questions of social control and cohesion, and the relationship between providers and recipients in a new and revealing manner. It is shown how these issues changed over the course of the nineteenth century, as the frontier between state and the voluntary sector shifted away from charity towards greater reliance on public finance, workers’ contributions… (more)

This book focuses on the recipients of charity, rather than the donors or institutions. By doing so, it tackles searching questions of social control and cohesion, and the relationship between providers and recipients in a new and revealing manner. It is shown how these issues changed over the course of the nineteenth century, as the frontier between state and the voluntary sector shifted away from charity towards greater reliance on public finance, workers’ contributions and mutual aid. In turn, these new sources of assistance enriched civil society, encouraging democratization, empowerment and social inclusion for previously marginalized members of the community.

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