Menu

Love’s Glory: Re-creations of Rumi

Religion


by
Andrew Harvey and Jalal Ud-Din Rumi

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 128 pages

File size: 1.9 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

In Love’s Glory, mystical scholar Andrew Harvey presents 108 stunning short poems by the thirteenth-century Sufi mystic and poet Rumi. Working from translations in various languages and drawing on two decades of studying Rumi’s work, Harvey’s “re-creations” are arranged in a dance around crucial mystical themes: nondual bliss, ordeal, ecstatic recognition, revelation, and gratitude.

 

“These short poems by Jalal-ud-Din Rumi, humanity’s most passionate and exalted mystic poet, are telegrams from Supreme Consciousness, sharp, dazzling, electric messages directly from Rumi’s Awakened Heart to our own, word-mirrors held up to us by Love itself so we can glimpse our own real face.”

—from the Introduction

In Love’s Glory, mystical scholar Andrew Harvey presents 108 stunning short poems by the thirteenth-century Sufi mystic and poet Rumi. Working from translations in various languages and drawing on two decades of studying Rumi’s work, Harvey’s “re-creations” are arranged in a dance around crucial mystical themes: nondual bliss, ordeal, ecstatic recognition, revelation, and gratitude.

 

“These short poems by Jalal-ud-Din Rumi, humanity’s most passionate… (more)

In Love’s Glory, mystical scholar Andrew Harvey presents 108 stunning short poems by the thirteenth-century Sufi mystic and poet Rumi. Working from translations in various languages and drawing on two decades of studying Rumi’s work, Harvey’s “re-creations” are arranged in a dance around crucial mystical themes: nondual bliss, ordeal, ecstatic recognition, revelation, and gratitude.

 

“These short poems by Jalal-ud-Din Rumi, humanity’s most passionate and exalted mystic poet, are telegrams from Supreme Consciousness, sharp, dazzling, electric messages directly from Rumi’s Awakened Heart to our own, word-mirrors held up to us by Love itself so we can glimpse our own real face.”

—from the Introduction

(less)