Ecological Security: An Evolutionary Perspective on Globalization


by
Dennis Clark Pirages and Theresa Manley DeGeest

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 296 pages

File size: 4.4 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English


Ecological Security moves the analysis of global environmental and resource issues to the next level by developing an ‘eco-evolutionary’ perspective for analyzing emerging problems associated with rapid globalization. Preserving future ecological security will depend upon maintaining dynamic equilibriums among human populations, and between them and pathogenic microorganisms, other species, and the sustaining capabilities of nature. This eco-evolutionary framework is used to anticipate and analyze emerging demographic, ecological, and technological discontinuities and dilemmas associated with rapid globalization. The authors conclude by stressing the need for new kinds of global public goods to mitigate the harshest impacts of these rapid and interrelated changes.

Ecological Security moves the analysis of global environmental and resource issues to the next level by developing an ‘eco-evolutionary’ perspective for analyzing emerging problems associated with rapid globalization. Preserving future ecological security will depend upon maintaining dynamic equilibriums among human populations, and between them and pathogenic microorganisms, other species, and the sustaining capabilities of nature. This eco-evolutionary framework… (more)

Ecological Security moves the analysis of global environmental and resource issues to the next level by developing an ‘eco-evolutionary’ perspective for analyzing emerging problems associated with rapid globalization. Preserving future ecological security will depend upon maintaining dynamic equilibriums among human populations, and between them and pathogenic microorganisms, other species, and the sustaining capabilities of nature. This eco-evolutionary framework is used to anticipate and analyze emerging demographic, ecological, and technological discontinuities and dilemmas associated with rapid globalization. The authors conclude by stressing the need for new kinds of global public goods to mitigate the harshest impacts of these rapid and interrelated changes.

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