Menu

Dance like a Man

Juvenile & Young Adult


by
Mahesh Dattani and Pamela Rooks

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 532 pages

Protection: DRM

Language: English

‘A playwright of world stature’—Mario Relich, Wasafiri Framed by the age-old battle between traditional authority and youthful rebellion, Dance Like a Man pivots on the strained relationship between Jairaj Parekh and his wife Ratna, both ageing Bharatanatayam dancers. When their daughter arranges for them to meet the boy she wants to marry, the fissures in the elderly couple’s relationship come to the fore. As old wounds are torn open again, both Jairaj and Ratna find that they must come to terms with their bitter past. The play was later adapted into a National Award-winning film. ‘At last we have a playwright who gives sixty million English-speaking Indians an identity’—Alyque Padamsee ‘Powerful and disturbing’—The New York Times

‘A playwright of world stature’—Mario Relich, Wasafiri Framed by the age-old battle between traditional authority and youthful rebellion, Dance Like a Man pivots on the strained relationship between Jairaj Parekh and his wife Ratna, both ageing Bharatanatayam dancers. When their daughter arranges for them to meet the boy she wants to marry, the fissures in the elderly couple’s relationship come to the fore. As old wounds are torn open again, both Jairaj and… (more)

‘A playwright of world stature’—Mario Relich, Wasafiri Framed by the age-old battle between traditional authority and youthful rebellion, Dance Like a Man pivots on the strained relationship between Jairaj Parekh and his wife Ratna, both ageing Bharatanatayam dancers. When their daughter arranges for them to meet the boy she wants to marry, the fissures in the elderly couple’s relationship come to the fore. As old wounds are torn open again, both Jairaj and Ratna find that they must come to terms with their bitter past. The play was later adapted into a National Award-winning film. ‘At last we have a playwright who gives sixty million English-speaking Indians an identity’—Alyque Padamsee ‘Powerful and disturbing’—The New York Times

(less)