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Ceramic Chemistry

Science and Technics


by
H. H. Stephenson

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 100 pages

File size: 1.7 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Modern Ceramics may be said to date from Brogniart 1770-1847. The predominance of the French chemists in the science of pottery during the early and middle parts of last century caused the word Ceramic to be transplanted into English and German. Seger and his colleagues then caused potters to turn their eyes to Berlin for a generation but there are not wanting signs that many of Seger s conclusions are being seriously questioned by the present school of ceramists. New vitality has sprung from the foundation of the American and English Ceramic Societies and from the adoption of the science as a subject for degrees in many American Universities. That Ceramics is suitable for University study both theoretical and practical there can be no doubt. It is the natural means of transition from Geology to Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Engineering. No other subject unites those five sciences so intimately. If this book should promote the secondary and higher study of the subject in England, the writers aim will be accomplished. He wishes to express his indebtedness to the Transactions of the English and American Ceramic Societies.

Modern Ceramics may be said to date from Brogniart 1770-1847. The predominance of the French chemists in the science of pottery during the early and middle parts of last century caused the word Ceramic to be transplanted into English and German. Seger and his colleagues then caused potters to turn their eyes to Berlin for a generation but there are not wanting signs that many of Seger s conclusions are being seriously questioned by the present school of ceramists.… (more)

Modern Ceramics may be said to date from Brogniart 1770-1847. The predominance of the French chemists in the science of pottery during the early and middle parts of last century caused the word Ceramic to be transplanted into English and German. Seger and his colleagues then caused potters to turn their eyes to Berlin for a generation but there are not wanting signs that many of Seger s conclusions are being seriously questioned by the present school of ceramists. New vitality has sprung from the foundation of the American and English Ceramic Societies and from the adoption of the science as a subject for degrees in many American Universities. That Ceramics is suitable for University study both theoretical and practical there can be no doubt. It is the natural means of transition from Geology to Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Engineering. No other subject unites those five sciences so intimately. If this book should promote the secondary and higher study of the subject in England, the writers aim will be accomplished. He wishes to express his indebtedness to the Transactions of the English and American Ceramic Societies.

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