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Captive State

Social science


by
George Monbiot

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 256 pages

Protection: DRM

Language: English

In the bestselling Captive State, which documents British politics under Blair, Monbiot uncovers what many suspected but few were able to prove: that big business is taking over Britain. Captive State documents the end of representative government in Britain. The traditional business of government – economic and development planning, law and order, protection of the workforce, consumer and environment – has rapidly been twisted out of its hands. The state is no longer the initiator of policy but an increasingly helpless bystander. Quietly, the state, the police, academia and the nominally independent media are falling into the hands of private business. And as institutional corruption strikes at the heart of public life, in a contest between the desires of big business and the needs of the electorate, the electorate loses out every time.

In the bestselling Captive State, which documents British politics under Blair, Monbiot uncovers what many suspected but few were able to prove: that big business is taking over Britain. Captive State documents the end of representative government in Britain. The traditional business of government – economic and development planning, law and order, protection of the workforce, consumer and environment – has rapidly been twisted out of its hands. The state is no longer… (more)

In the bestselling Captive State, which documents British politics under Blair, Monbiot uncovers what many suspected but few were able to prove: that big business is taking over Britain. Captive State documents the end of representative government in Britain. The traditional business of government – economic and development planning, law and order, protection of the workforce, consumer and environment – has rapidly been twisted out of its hands. The state is no longer the initiator of policy but an increasingly helpless bystander. Quietly, the state, the police, academia and the nominally independent media are falling into the hands of private business. And as institutional corruption strikes at the heart of public life, in a contest between the desires of big business and the needs of the electorate, the electorate loses out every time.

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