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Building a New China in Cinema: The Chinese Left-Wing Cinema Movement, 1932-1937

Social science


by
Laikwan Pang

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 304 pages

File size: 10.3 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Building a New China in Cinema introduces English readers for the first time to one of the most exciting left-wing cinema traditions in the world. This unique book explores the history, ideology, and aesthetics of China’s left-wing cinema movement, a quixotic film culture that was as political as commercial, as militant as sensationalist. Drawing on detailed archival research, Pang demonstrates that this cinema movement was a product of the era’s social, economic, and political discourses. The author offers a close analysis of many rarely seen films, richly illustrated with over eighty stills collected from the Beijing Film Archive. With its original conceptual approach and rich use of primary sources, this book will be of interest not only to scholars and fans of Chinese cinema but to those who study the relationship between cinema and modernity.

Building a New China in Cinema introduces English readers for the first time to one of the most exciting left-wing cinema traditions in the world. This unique book explores the history, ideology, and aesthetics of China’s left-wing cinema movement, a quixotic film culture that was as political as commercial, as militant as sensationalist. Drawing on detailed archival research, Pang demonstrates that this cinema movement was a product of the era’s social, economic,… (more)

Building a New China in Cinema introduces English readers for the first time to one of the most exciting left-wing cinema traditions in the world. This unique book explores the history, ideology, and aesthetics of China’s left-wing cinema movement, a quixotic film culture that was as political as commercial, as militant as sensationalist. Drawing on detailed archival research, Pang demonstrates that this cinema movement was a product of the era’s social, economic, and political discourses. The author offers a close analysis of many rarely seen films, richly illustrated with over eighty stills collected from the Beijing Film Archive. With its original conceptual approach and rich use of primary sources, this book will be of interest not only to scholars and fans of Chinese cinema but to those who study the relationship between cinema and modernity.

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