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A Shorter Commentary on Romans by Karl Barth: With an Introductory Essay by Maico Michielin

Religion


by
Maico M. Michielin

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 146 pages

File size: 2.1 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

This reissue of Barth’s A Shorter Commentary on Romans links to the renewed interest today in a ‘theological’ interpretation of Scripture. In response to the modern preoccupation with what lies behind the text (the author’s context), and to a postmodern preoccupation with what lies in front of the text (the reader’s context), both theologians and biblical scholars are asking the following questions: ‘What is the relationship between the biblical text, interpreter and God?’ ‘Can the Bible be read both as an historical document and as a text that speaks to us today, and if so, how can it do so?’ Barth’s commentarial practice as exemplified in A Shorter Commentary on Romans answers these questions. This book is presented in two parts: first, an introduction by Maico Michielin helping readers understand Barth’s theological exegetical approach to interpreting Scripture and showing readers how to let Scripture address theological and ethical concerns for today; the main body of the book then follows – the republication of the original English translation by D.H. van Daalen of Barth’s A Shorter Commentary on Romans.

This reissue of Barth’s A Shorter Commentary on Romans links to the renewed interest today in a ‘theological’ interpretation of Scripture. In response to the modern preoccupation with what lies behind the text (the author’s context), and to a postmodern preoccupation with what lies in front of the text (the reader’s context), both theologians and biblical scholars are asking the following questions: ‘What is the relationship between the biblical text, interpreter… (more)

This reissue of Barth’s A Shorter Commentary on Romans links to the renewed interest today in a ‘theological’ interpretation of Scripture. In response to the modern preoccupation with what lies behind the text (the author’s context), and to a postmodern preoccupation with what lies in front of the text (the reader’s context), both theologians and biblical scholars are asking the following questions: ‘What is the relationship between the biblical text, interpreter and God?’ ‘Can the Bible be read both as an historical document and as a text that speaks to us today, and if so, how can it do so?’ Barth’s commentarial practice as exemplified in A Shorter Commentary on Romans answers these questions. This book is presented in two parts: first, an introduction by Maico Michielin helping readers understand Barth’s theological exegetical approach to interpreting Scripture and showing readers how to let Scripture address theological and ethical concerns for today; the main body of the book then follows – the republication of the original English translation by D.H. van Daalen of Barth’s A Shorter Commentary on Romans.

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