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Who Turned Out the Lights?

Science and Technics


by
Scott Bittle and Jean Johnson

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 368 pages

File size: 1.2 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

From the editors of PublicAgenda.org, an entertaining, irreverent, and absolutely essential nonpartisan guide to the energy crisis

Energy: It’s a problem that never goes away (despite our best efforts as a nation to ignore it). Why has there been so much talk and so little action? In Who Turned Out the Lights? Scott Bittle and Jean Johnson offer a much-needed reality check: The “Drill, Baby, Drill” versus “Every Day Is Earth Day” battle is not solving our problems, and the finger-pointing is just holding us up.

Sorting through the political posturing and confusing techno-speak, they provide a fair-minded, “let’s skip the jargon” explanation of the choices we face. And chapters such as “It’s All Right Now (In Fact, It’s a Gas)” prove that, while the problem is serious, getting a grip on it doesn’t have to be. In the end, the authors present options from the right, left, and center but take just one position: The country must change the way it gets and uses energy, and the first step is to understand the choices.

From the editors of PublicAgenda.org, an entertaining, irreverent, and absolutely essential nonpartisan guide to the energy crisis

Energy: It’s a problem that never goes away (despite our best efforts as a nation to ignore it). Why has there been so much talk and so little action? In Who Turned Out the Lights? Scott Bittle and Jean Johnson offer a much-needed reality check: The “Drill, Baby, Drill” versus “Every Day Is Earth Day” battle is not solving our problems,… (more)

From the editors of PublicAgenda.org, an entertaining, irreverent, and absolutely essential nonpartisan guide to the energy crisis

Energy: It’s a problem that never goes away (despite our best efforts as a nation to ignore it). Why has there been so much talk and so little action? In Who Turned Out the Lights? Scott Bittle and Jean Johnson offer a much-needed reality check: The “Drill, Baby, Drill” versus “Every Day Is Earth Day” battle is not solving our problems, and the finger-pointing is just holding us up.

Sorting through the political posturing and confusing techno-speak, they provide a fair-minded, “let’s skip the jargon” explanation of the choices we face. And chapters such as “It’s All Right Now (In Fact, It’s a Gas)” prove that, while the problem is serious, getting a grip on it doesn’t have to be. In the end, the authors present options from the right, left, and center but take just one position: The country must change the way it gets and uses energy, and the first step is to understand the choices.

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