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The Vietnamese Family in Change: The Case of the Red River Delta

Social science


by
Pham Van Bich

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 270 pages

File size: 516 KB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Like most societies Vietnam has seen marked changes in family structures and dynamics this century. For Vietnam however these changes have been especially radical. After decades of French acculturation the 1940s brought sweeping economic changes and a move away from collectivism. Perhaps because of Vietnam’s long isolation from the late 1970s into the early 1990s, very little has been written on the Vietnamese family.

This text provides an examination of the Vietnamese family focusing on two fundamental relationships – husband-wife and parent-children – within their wider social and historical context. The author explores how and why marital partners are chosen; individual’s domains within the family; reproduction and birth control; son preference; ancestor worship; and the role of the state.

As such, the study will be of interest not just to sociologists but also to those scholars looking to understand the current social transformation of Vietnam.

Like most societies Vietnam has seen marked changes in family structures and dynamics this century. For Vietnam however these changes have been especially radical. After decades of French acculturation the 1940s brought sweeping economic changes and a move away from collectivism. Perhaps because of Vietnam’s long isolation from the late 1970s into the early 1990s, very little has been written on the Vietnamese family.

This text provides an examination of the Vietnamese‚Ķ (more)

Like most societies Vietnam has seen marked changes in family structures and dynamics this century. For Vietnam however these changes have been especially radical. After decades of French acculturation the 1940s brought sweeping economic changes and a move away from collectivism. Perhaps because of Vietnam’s long isolation from the late 1970s into the early 1990s, very little has been written on the Vietnamese family.

This text provides an examination of the Vietnamese family focusing on two fundamental relationships – husband-wife and parent-children – within their wider social and historical context. The author explores how and why marital partners are chosen; individual’s domains within the family; reproduction and birth control; son preference; ancestor worship; and the role of the state.

As such, the study will be of interest not just to sociologists but also to those scholars looking to understand the current social transformation of Vietnam.

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