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The Sovereignty of Taste

Human Science


by
James S. Hans

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 200 pages

File size: 431 KB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

In the tradition of Matthew Arnold, Lionel Trilling, and Iris Murdoch, Hans addresses the forms, rhythms, and patterns of works of literature with a Socratic, inductive approach. Taste is the faculty that attempts to bring the internal and external rhythms on which our lives are based into accord, and Hans makes the case that great writers are attuned to these rhythms in salutary ways. By attending to writers such as Sophocles, Kant, Dickinson, and Faulkner, Hans assists readers in undertaking what we might call a ?re-tasting’ of the world. The Sovereignty of Taste is a provocative, interdisciplinary, and learned book that is gracefully written and delightfully unfettered by scholarly apparatus and invocation. — William Monroe, author of Power to Hurt: The Virtues of Alienation

In the tradition of Matthew Arnold, Lionel Trilling, and Iris Murdoch, Hans addresses the forms, rhythms, and patterns of works of literature with a Socratic, inductive approach. Taste is the faculty that attempts to bring the internal and external rhythms on which our lives are based into accord, and Hans makes the case that great writers are attuned to these rhythms in salutary ways. By attending to writers such as Sophocles, Kant, Dickinson, and Faulkner, Hans… (more)

In the tradition of Matthew Arnold, Lionel Trilling, and Iris Murdoch, Hans addresses the forms, rhythms, and patterns of works of literature with a Socratic, inductive approach. Taste is the faculty that attempts to bring the internal and external rhythms on which our lives are based into accord, and Hans makes the case that great writers are attuned to these rhythms in salutary ways. By attending to writers such as Sophocles, Kant, Dickinson, and Faulkner, Hans assists readers in undertaking what we might call a ?re-tasting’ of the world. The Sovereignty of Taste is a provocative, interdisciplinary, and learned book that is gracefully written and delightfully unfettered by scholarly apparatus and invocation. — William Monroe, author of Power to Hurt: The Virtues of Alienation

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