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Playing the Game

Literary collections


by
Robert Baden-Powell and Mario Sica

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 448 pages

Protection: DRM

Language: English

Drawing on Baden-Powell’s extensive archive, Playing the Game is a rich and evocative selection of his writings, on peace – a major theme throughout his career and the theme of the 2007 centenary celebrations, on his own life, from his wonderfull idiosyncratic anecdotal autobiography and includes a healthy sprinkling of some of BP’s more memorable aphorisms, such as ‘I don’t mind confessing I have a weakness for hippos’ and ‘The man who holds the average boy’s attention for more than seven minutes is a genius’, not to mention ‘Knowledge without character is mere pie-crust’. Imbued with a strong sense of the splendour and the old-school Empire feel of Baden-Powell’s work, Playing the Game offers a dazzling window into a world that’s gone, but whose legacy remains alive, not least in the 28 million members of the Scouts Association

Drawing on Baden-Powell’s extensive archive, Playing the Game is a rich and evocative selection of his writings, on peace – a major theme throughout his career and the theme of the 2007 centenary celebrations, on his own life, from his wonderfull idiosyncratic anecdotal autobiography and includes a healthy sprinkling of some of BP’s more memorable aphorisms, such as ‘I don’t mind confessing I have a weakness for hippos’ and ‘The man who holds the average boy’s… (more)

Drawing on Baden-Powell’s extensive archive, Playing the Game is a rich and evocative selection of his writings, on peace – a major theme throughout his career and the theme of the 2007 centenary celebrations, on his own life, from his wonderfull idiosyncratic anecdotal autobiography and includes a healthy sprinkling of some of BP’s more memorable aphorisms, such as ‘I don’t mind confessing I have a weakness for hippos’ and ‘The man who holds the average boy’s attention for more than seven minutes is a genius’, not to mention ‘Knowledge without character is mere pie-crust’. Imbued with a strong sense of the splendour and the old-school Empire feel of Baden-Powell’s work, Playing the Game offers a dazzling window into a world that’s gone, but whose legacy remains alive, not least in the 28 million members of the Scouts Association

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