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Nagauta: The Heart of Kabuki Music

Arts


by
William P. Malm

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 360 pages

File size: 28.5 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

THE KABUKI theater of Japan has achieved a growing reputation as one of the world’s most brilliant achievements in the field of theater. And the number of studies made on the subject in the West has been considerable. Yet, in spite of the fact that so much of the unique brilliance of the kabuki stage depends on the character of its music, the manner in which it is used, and its integral connection with the development of the dramatic impact of the plays, very little has been written on this phase of the genre. As the author points out, “Writers on kabuki recognize the fact that the spectacular dramaturgical elements of kabuki float on a variegated but, for the Westerner, generally undifferentiated sea of music. Nevertheless, because of space or specialization, they have been unable to complete their discussions with actual musical analyses.” The present study, then, “is an attempt to fill this gap by presenting an introductory study of one of its major musical elements nagauta.”

THE KABUKI theater of Japan has achieved a growing reputation as one of the world’s most brilliant achievements in the field of theater. And the number of studies made on the subject in the West has been considerable. Yet, in spite of the fact that so much of the unique brilliance of the kabuki stage depends on the character of its music, the manner in which it is used, and its integral connection with the development of the dramatic impact of the plays, very littleā€¦ (more)

THE KABUKI theater of Japan has achieved a growing reputation as one of the world’s most brilliant achievements in the field of theater. And the number of studies made on the subject in the West has been considerable. Yet, in spite of the fact that so much of the unique brilliance of the kabuki stage depends on the character of its music, the manner in which it is used, and its integral connection with the development of the dramatic impact of the plays, very little has been written on this phase of the genre. As the author points out, “Writers on kabuki recognize the fact that the spectacular dramaturgical elements of kabuki float on a variegated but, for the Westerner, generally undifferentiated sea of music. Nevertheless, because of space or specialization, they have been unable to complete their discussions with actual musical analyses.” The present study, then, “is an attempt to fill this gap by presenting an introductory study of one of its major musical elements nagauta.”

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