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Connecting Cultures

Social science


by
Emma Bainbridge (Editor)

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 192 pages

File size: 2.6 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English

This lively and incisive collection of essays from an international group of scholars explores the interactions between cultures originating in Africa, India, the Caribbean, and Europe. Those interactions have been both destructive and richly productive, and the consequences continue to ‘trouble the living stream’ today. Several of the essays focus on the continuing reverberations of political and cultural conflicts in post-Apartheid Southern Africa, including the presence in Britain of Zimbabwean asylum seekers. Other authors discuss the ways in which Indian culture has transformed novelistic and cinematic forms. A third group of essays examines the attempts of West Indian women writers to reclaim their territory and describe it in their own terms. The collection as a whole is framed by essays which deal with discourses of ‘terror’ and ‘terrorism’ and how we translate and read them in the wake of 9/11.

This book was previously published as a special issue of Third World Quarterly.

This lively and incisive collection of essays from an international group of scholars explores the interactions between cultures originating in Africa, India, the Caribbean, and Europe. Those interactions have been both destructive and richly productive, and the consequences continue to ‘trouble the living stream’ today. Several of the essays focus on the continuing reverberations of political and cultural conflicts in post-Apartheid Southern Africa, including theā€¦ (more)

This lively and incisive collection of essays from an international group of scholars explores the interactions between cultures originating in Africa, India, the Caribbean, and Europe. Those interactions have been both destructive and richly productive, and the consequences continue to ‘trouble the living stream’ today. Several of the essays focus on the continuing reverberations of political and cultural conflicts in post-Apartheid Southern Africa, including the presence in Britain of Zimbabwean asylum seekers. Other authors discuss the ways in which Indian culture has transformed novelistic and cinematic forms. A third group of essays examines the attempts of West Indian women writers to reclaim their territory and describe it in their own terms. The collection as a whole is framed by essays which deal with discourses of ‘terror’ and ‘terrorism’ and how we translate and read them in the wake of 9/11.

This book was previously published as a special issue of Third World Quarterly.

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