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Behind the Silence: Chinese Voices on Abortion

Social science


by
Jing-Bao Nie (Author) and Arthur Kleinman (Introduction author)

Book Details

Format: EPUB

Page count: 304 pages

File size: 1.5 MB

Protection: DRM

Language: English


Behind the Silence is the first in-depth work in any language to explore the diverse perspectives of mainland Chinese regarding induced abortion and fetal life in the context of the world’s most ambitious and intrusive family planning program. Through his investigation of public silence, official standpoints, forgotten controversies from the imperial era, popular opinions, women’s personal stories, doctors’ narratives, and the problem of coerced abortion, Nie Jing-Bao brings to light a surprising range of beliefs concerning fetal life and the morality of abortion, yet finds overall an acceptance of national population policies. China’s internal plurality, the author argues, must be taken seriously if the West is to open a fruitful cross-cultural dialogue.

Behind the Silence is the first in-depth work in any language to explore the diverse perspectives of mainland Chinese regarding induced abortion and fetal life in the context of the world’s most ambitious and intrusive family planning program. Through his investigation of public silence, official standpoints, forgotten controversies from the imperial era, popular opinions, women’s personal stories, doctors’ narratives, and the problem of coerced abortion, Nie Jing-Bao… (more)

Behind the Silence is the first in-depth work in any language to explore the diverse perspectives of mainland Chinese regarding induced abortion and fetal life in the context of the world’s most ambitious and intrusive family planning program. Through his investigation of public silence, official standpoints, forgotten controversies from the imperial era, popular opinions, women’s personal stories, doctors’ narratives, and the problem of coerced abortion, Nie Jing-Bao brings to light a surprising range of beliefs concerning fetal life and the morality of abortion, yet finds overall an acceptance of national population policies. China’s internal plurality, the author argues, must be taken seriously if the West is to open a fruitful cross-cultural dialogue.

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